Building
the evidence
base

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One of the key objectives set out in the UN Trust Fund’s Strategy 2015-2020 is the creation of an evidence hub to collect, reflect on and share the knowledge and lessons learned through the work of grantees.

Key ways in which this is being achieved is by: improving the UN Trust Fund’s evaluation practice and results monitoring to produce high quality, useful evidence; investing in longer-term projects where the initial project period shows clear potential to build on previous achievements and learn from successes; and supporting grantees to improve their own capacity in data collection, monitoring and evaluation.


Building on previous UN Trust Fund efforts, a small set of standard, common indicators was developed in late 2017 to enable us to collect and aggregate data on similar results achieved across our portfolio of grantees, a crucial part of enabling the UN Trust Fund to evaluate results attributable to the organizations awarded grants. This methodology revealed, for example, that in 2017, 36 grantee organizations reported that at least 10,547 women and girls were reached using specialist support services, including trauma counselling and shelters, thanks to UN Trust Fund projects; 34 grantees reported or referred at least 3,547 cases of sexual and gender-based violence against women and girls to local state service providers; and 17 grantees reached 333 schools to improve the curriculum or implement policies, practices or services to prevent and respond to violence against women and girls.


As well as common indicators, project evaluations are a core source of results, lessons learned and evidence on what works and what does not, across the UN Trust Fund’s portfolio. As a first step, in 2016, we commissioned a meta-analysis of findings from evaluation reports of grants made between 2008 and 2012 and a meta-evaluation of the quality of 77 evaluations. In 2017 this informed improvements in evaluation practice including increasing budget allocations for final evaluations of grantees; centralizing the evaluation budget and evaluations management for small organizations to address their lack of capacity to manage evaluations; and introducing quality assurance measures for the management of all decentralized evaluations.


The new grants evaluations library on the UN Trust Fund’s public website is the start of a larger endeavour to build an evidence and learning hub by 2020 to catalyse and harness the depth of knowledge and lessons learned through the work of grantees and so contribute to the evidence base on ending violence against women and girls. From 2018, all satisfactory quality project evaluations will be uploaded onto the website with the aim of disseminating the findings among practitioners and partners.

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BY INVITATION ONLY

In 2017 one more organization joined our “by invitation only” window of grantees who are encouraged to apply again for funding – bypassing the usual threeyear moratorium on a second grant application – based on the potential to scale up and replicate or the significant impact from the results achieved under the first grant. There are now five grantees in this cohort, of which two are highlighted here:


The current three-year project implemented by the Victims Support Section of the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia builds on the achievements of their earlier UN Trust Fundsupported project to promote gender equality and improve access to justice for female survivors of gender-based violence under the Khmer Rouge regime in the 1970s. During 2017, 255 civil parties and victims of gender-based violence were logistically supported to participate in the court hearings and forums. The grantee is also working to assist in connecting implementers with sources of funding. For example, one of the 22 proposed reparations projects, the Pka Sla Project, which is related to forced marriage under the Khmer Rouge, collected approximately USD 500,000 for implementation under the coordination of the Victims Support Section. The Victims Support Section interviewed about 80 civil parties about discrimination against survivors of forced marriage in their communities and found that discrimination has decreased significantly due to a change in the social and economic situation in Cambodia and a growing understanding of and empathy towards survivors.

Raising Voices is also a second generation grantee of the UN Trust Fund. This NGO, which is based in Uganda, received a first grant in 2010 to implement its innovative and successful SASA! methodology to prevent violence against women and HIV, and a second grant in 2016 to adapt the methodology. This research project aims to understand the processes and potential challenges of implementing and adapting the SASA! intervention in real world circumstances versus a controlled research environment. Using both qualitative and quantitative methods, Raising Voices is exploring context-specific implementation processes and comparing how and why partners are/are not achieving SASA!’s intended outcomes with three partner organizations in rural Tanzania, refugee camps in Ethiopia, and a Caribbean community in Haiti. This is a critical need as global interest and funding for primary prevention of violence against women and HIV increases, and more and more programming and research organizations begin to implement the SASA! approach as a key prevention tool.

MONITORING
MISSIONS

“WOMEN FEEL HESITANT TO SHARE ANY INCIDENT RELATED TO VIOLENCE. THE TRAININGS GAVE US PROPER GUIDELINES AND APPROACH ON HOW TO ORGANIZE OURSELVES AND TACKLE SOCIAL ISSUES. WE ARE NOW ABLE TO IDENTIFY POTENTIAL ALLIES AND OPPONENTS, INITIATE CAMPAIGNS AND RESOLVE ISSUES IN VILLAGES.” Ms Ramila Devi, women’s peer group member, Dungarpur, Rajasthan

During 2017, the UN Trust Fund team conducted 32 monitoring missions to projects in 22 countries, six of which were to provide training and support to small organizations.7 One of the projects visited by the UN Trust Fund team in 2017 was in the Sonitpur district in the Indian State of Assam where Pragya, a civil society organization, is working to address violence against women from ethnic minority tribal communities. The project is supporting a kitchen garden seeds distribution programme that has helped the village to grow essential vegetables, which are used both for their own consumption and to sell in local markets.


Pragya is working with 100 women’s peer groups and panchayats (village councils) which have over time become cohesive and vibrant and attracted new members. The grantee also continued to work with the 300 women leaders trained in providing counselling and psychosocial support so that they could offer leadership and guidance to the peer groups to which they belong.


During 2017, 38 cases of gender-based violence were reported by women through empowerment centres set up under the project and 2,812 women benefited directly from interventions and trainings through the women’s peer groups and village councils.


Workshops were held with 348 elected members of village councils to orient them on participative and inclusive governance and gendersensitive budgeting and planning. Ninety local mentors trained through the project have been conducting “Know Your Rights” campaigns in their respective clusters, reaching 6,360 community members.


The monitoring visit clearly indicated the scope in areas of convergence where the work of Pragya and the UN Trust Fund can reinforce each other, for example in getting access to relevant State machineries and feeding learnings from the project into future initiatives.

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Leaving no one behind in Latin America

“AT FIRST APPROACH WE WERE SHOCKED. WE LEARNED AND WE CONTINUE TO LEARN FROM ADULT WOMEN. THERE IS MUCH IGNORANCE, AS YOUNG PEOPLE, OF WHAT POLITICAL VIOLENCE HAS MEANT IN OUR COUNTRY. IF WE ALL CONTRIBUTE, WE CAN DO GREAT THINGS FOR PEOPLE, ESPECIALLY OLDER WOMEN AND OUR SOCIETY.”

Delia Gavino,

a representative of the Regional Council of Youth in Huánuco, Peru, and a young participant in the programme

Three projects in Latin America implemented by UN Trust Fund grantees focused on women and girls in groups that have traditionally been underserved in terms of violence reduction initiatives and support for survivors: older women and indigenous women and girls.


In Peru, the Red Nacional de Promocion de la Mujer is implementing a project aimed at reducing gender-based violence against older women who were victims of conflict-related violence during Peru’s internal armed conflict in the 1980s and 1990s. The legacy of widespread sexual violence during this period and the pervasive impunity enjoyed by the perpetrators, are reflected in the continuing high levels of violence against women in the country and the shame and stigma associated with this violence.


The project is taking place in Ayacucho and Huánuco, two regions that were greatly affected by the conflict and that today have among the highest prevalence of violence against women in the country. It is also encouraging an intergenerational exchange of experiences between older women and their daughters and granddaughters; empowering older women survivors of violence; and inspiring young women to demand better protection services and an end to violence against women in all its forms.


Since the beginning of the project, there have been some significant positive developments. Some 335 direct beneficiaries have received training, almost 93 per cent of the overall target figure for the project: eight workshops were planned, but in fact 12 took place. And more than 1,000 people took part in the six campaigns that the grantee organized or co-organized.


In Nicaragua, the women’s organization MADRE is working with a long-standing partner, the local indigenous women’s organization Wangki Tangni, to reduce violence against indigenous women and girls in 63 Miskito communities. The women targeted by the project live in remote communities on Nicaragua’s North Atlantic coast, so it can be almost impossible for them to access shelters or local resources. One of the aims of the project is to advocate for the effective implementation of Nicaragua’s Law 779 on violence against women and girls.


Through the masculinity workshops, participants have increased understanding of the impact of men's behaviour on women and on youth. Women have reported that they are seeing a decrease in violence within their homes and communities as a result of their increased knowledge of their rights and the laws that protect those rights. They report that men who are participating in this project and who are listening to the Wangki Tangni radio broadcasts are more supportive of women's rights and have become less violent. Women have shared that they feel confident to stand up for their rights as a result of the workshops with Wangki Tangni, MADRE and the radio broadcasts. Each of the 42 communities within the seven territories has made commitments to develop and implement cultural events and create groups within their communities. The project has trained 30 women in broadcasting and reporting and distributed 400 solar radios to make sure everyone can tune in. The radio broadcasts reach 115 communities, six days a week and it is the only station that broadcasts in Miskito, the local language.


A total of 1,260 indigenous women and girls have reported that they are more aware of their rights and Law 779 as a result of this programme and the workshops led by MADRE and Wangki Tangni, as well as a result of the radio programmes. In addition, 42 Community promotoras have led the participatory process of developing community action plans within their own communities.


A project implemented in Brazil by Casa da Mulher Trabalhadora sought to raise awareness among marginalized groups of young women in Rio de Janeiro on identifying violence, including technology-related violence, and how to address it. Three months after training 95 young people, which took place in March and April 2017, 94.4 per cent of young women who had participated had carried out some form of activity in their locality. The most common activities were conversations with family or friends on the issue (83.3 per cent); a workshop, either with other women or in mixed groups (55.6 per cent); and distributing materials on women’s rights (50 per cent). Through its “multiplication” approach the project managed to reach 2,969 women in schools and in public places. Evaluations from 76 participants found that 86 per cent felt the activity had increased their understanding of violence against women and 56 per cent were interested in taking part in other actions.

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